9/11 Remembrance

 “WE PROMISE TO REMEMBER THE 11th OF SEPTEMBER”

On Sunday September 9, 2012 the Brewster Fire Department hosted a 9/11 remembrance ceremony at Fire Headquarters.

The memorial service honored all first responders and civilian victims who perished in the tragic events that occurred on September 11, 2001 in New York City, Washington D.C, and Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

Participants included the Brewster Fire Department, Brewster Police Department Honor Guard, Orleans Fire Department Honor Guard, Veterans of Foreign Wars Honor Guard, Brewster Town officials, local Scout groups, and other regional emergency service organizations and first responders. Retired Fire Department of New York Battalion Chief Rod O’Connor who was serving in the 57th Battalion in Brooklyn during these terrorist attacks on our country and worked during the rescue and recovery period was the keynote speaker for the event.

Superb renditions of the National Anthem, America the Beautiful, and God Bless America were sung by Brewster resident Mary LaVasseur and Jennifer Connick provided an outstanding performance of Amazing Grace on the bagpipes.  Deacon Don Biron offered the Invocation during the ceremony.

Special thanks go to Ralph and Rose Ingegneri and Michael Fitzgerald for donating the flowers for the event and for their assistance in developing the memorial program.

The Brewster Fire Department would like to thank all of the members of our community who joined us in remembering the victims of the tragic terrorist events that occurred on September 11, 2001.

“May We Never Forget”

 

Photos Courtesy of The Cape Cod Times

 

COMMUNITY CPR TRAINING

The Brewster Fire Department will be sponsoring two sessions of Community CPR Training over the next several months. This training is designed to enhance our standing as a Heart Safe Community and provide vital life saving training regarding sudden cardiac arrest to our residents. Here are some interesting facts:

  • 385,000 out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrests occur on an annual basis.
  • 88% of these occur at home where limited emergency medical treatment may not be readily available.
  • Typically, only 8% of these victims survive
  • Immediate bystander CPR can double or triple a victim’s survival

    rate.

  • Learn the Cardiac Chain of Survival

    o Early recognition of cardiac emergency and access to EMS o Early CPR
    o Early Defibrillation
    o Early advanced care

    Attendees at each of these three (3) hour sessions will become certified in basic CPR and use of the Automatic External Defibrillator (AED)

    Session #1 Wednesday November 14 6:00 p.m.
    Session #2 Wednesday February 13 6:00 p.m.
    Location will be Brewster Fire Headquarters 1657 Main Street Brewster MA

    Individuals interested in attending this training shall call Fire Headquarters at 508-896-7018 to confirm your choice of session.

    Be Prepared to Save a Life, Learn CPR!

Heart Rescue Project Video

Weather Dangers

Summertime can bring a range of weather challenges and potential dangers. Some of these threats can occur with little warning, so do what you can to prepare by assembling an emergency kit and forming a plan of action.

Find out what you should do if faced with the following weather dangers:

Lightning: In the U.S., lightning kills more people each year than tornadoes and hurricanes. If you can hear thunder, you are within striking distance and should seek shelter in an enclosed building or vehicle. While indoors, don’t use a corded phone, a computer or other electrical appliances; and avoid contact with plumbing (don’t shower, wash hands, do laundry, etc.). Learn more about lightning safety and get tips on what to do if you’re outdoors during a thunderstorm.

Floods: If you have time, move essential items to an upper floor. Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water. Do not walk through moving water that is six inches or higher. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground. Learn more about what to do before, during, and after a flood.

Hurricanes: If you can’t evacuate, get inside and secure external and internal doors. Stay away from windows and doors and take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level. Learn more about what to do before, during, and after a hurricane.

Tornadoes: Storm cellars and basements are the safest locations, but if they aren’t available, go to an interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level. Stay away from windows, doors, outside walls, and corners. If you are in a trailer or mobile home, go to a sturdy, nearby building. Learn more about what to do before, during, and after a tornado.

Extreme Heat: Stay indoors as much as possible. Consider spending the hottest part of the day in an air-conditioned public building, such as a library or shopping mall. Never leave children or pets alone in vehicles. Learn more about what to do in extreme heat.

Wildfires: If your home is threatened by a wildfire, you must evacuate. If you have time, bring an emergency kit that includes copies of important documents. Learn more about what to do before, during, and after a wildfire.

Earthquakes: If you are indoors, stay away from windows, doors, and outside walls and get under a sturdy table or desk. If you are outside, keep away from buildings, streetlights, and utility wires. If you’re in a moving vehicle, safely stop the vehicle in an open area and stay inside. Learn more about what to do before, during, and after an earthquake.

Fire Safety for Older Adults

At age 50 you’ve worked for years to enjoy the freedom and experiences life has to offer. At age 65 you’ve become a mover and shaker—meeting new people, traveling, spending time with the grandchildren and learning new hobbies. Don’t let your years of memories and your life today go up in flames.

As you age, your risk of death from fire increases significantly. Practice safe smoking, safe cooking, and safe heating in your home. With a little fire safety know-how and this website, you can help save lives from unintentional fires, including your own.  read more here

Learn About Fire Escape Plans

In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared. Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly. In less than 30 seconds, a small flame can get completely out of control and turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for a house to fill with thick black smoke and become engulfed in flames.

 

Prepare and practice your fire escape plan twice a year with everyone in your household, including children and people with disabilities. It’s also a good idea to practice your plan with overnight guests. Some tips to consider when preparing your escape plan include:

  • Draw a map of each level of your home and show all doors and windows. Find two ways to get out of each room. Make sure all doors and windows that lead outside open easily.
  • Only purchase collapsible escape ladders evaluated by a recognized testing laboratory. Use the ladder only in a real emergency.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own in case you cannot help them.
  • Have a plan for everyone in your home who has a disability.
  • Practice your fire escape plan at night and during the daytime.

Security Bars Require Special Precautions

Security bars may help to keep your family safe from intruders, but they can also trap you inside in the event of a deadly fire! Windows and doors withsecurity bars must have quick release devices to allow them to be opened immediately in an emergency. Make sure everyone in the family understands and practices how to properly operate and open locked or barred doors and windows.

Immediately Leave the Home

When a fire occurs, get out fast: you may only have seconds to escape safely. Take the safest exit route, but if you must escape through smoke, remember to crawl low, under the smoke and keep your mouth covered. The smoke contains toxic gases, which can disorient you or, at worst, overcome you.

Never Open Doors that are Hot to the Touch

When you come to a closed door, feel the doorknob and door to make sure that fire is not on the other side. If either is hot, leave the door closed and use your secondary escape route. If the door feels cool, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.

If you can’t get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors to keep the smoke out. Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.

Designate a Meeting Place Outside and Take Attendance

Designate a meeting location a safe distance in front of your home. For example, meet under a specific tree or at the end of the driveway or front sidewalk to make sure everyone has gotten out safely and no one will be hurt looking for someone who is already safe. Make sure everyone in your home knows how to call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number and that your house number can be seen day or night from the street.

Once Out, Stay Out

Remember to escape first and then notify the fire department using the 9-1-1 system or proper local emergency number in your area. Never go back into a burning building for any reason. Teach children not to hide from firefighters. If someone is missing, or pets are trapped inside your home, tell the firefighters right away. They are equipped to perform rescues safely.

How Fire-Safe Is Your Home?

You won’t know until you do a fire safety walkthrough.

Conduct a fire safety walkthrough of your home on a regular basis. Use the following tips to help you in your walkthrough:

  • Keep clothes, blankets, curtains, towels, and other items that can easily catch on fire at least three feet from space heaters and away from stove burners.
  • Place space heaters where they will not tip over easily.
  • Have chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a professional.
  • Always use a metal mesh screen with fireplaces and leave glass doors open while burning a fire.
  • Never leave cooking unattended.
  • Be sure your stove and small appliances are off before going to bed.
  • Check for worn wires and do not run cords under rugs or furniture.
  • Never overload electrical sockets.
  • Keep lighters and matches out of the reach of children.
  • Never leave cigarettes unattended and never smoke in bed.
  • Make sure cigarettes and ashes are out. The cigarette needs to be completely stubbed out in the ashtray or run under water.